Talk:Problem with failing memory slot

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Can anyone confirm that this solution works? Why a strip of metal (Could cardboard or some other material be used)? What size of an object is needed to make the RAM connect?

Can the person who wrote it confirm it? I have done it 2x, and have a few pictures. Perhaps Ill post them on my site later today. The first time, I used a strip of metal, and the second time, I used a tightly rolled up piece of paper. The paper method turned out to be more stable, as the metal caused the door to warp a bit. --breaklog

OK, I have not been able to get the pictures I took (at least not yet), but I did find someone else who did something similar, with a rolled up piece of paper this past may on Link --Breaklog 02:55, 8 October 2006 (CEST)


With the second slot failing after some time / inserting new Ram-module this solution worked out for me fine. I rolled a piece of paper max 2mm and placed it in the middle of the module parallel to the slot. make it thin enough so you don't press it to hard, and make it small enough because of ventilation.

Soldering experiences

I was able to resolder my secondary memory slot which had failed. I did it with a standard hobbyist 25w soldering iron with a small(ish) tip. Using the very end of the tip, I was able to exert moderate pressure on each pin and resolder it to the board. I added no extra solder and I did not use flux. Initially, on refitting, the laptop didn't work (I'd shorted a couple of pins). After fixing this, it booted and worked. Prior to effecting this repair I had found that putting pressure on a DIMM made it work more reliably, so while I was resoldering the pins of the socket I also resoldered the supports, and put some pressure on them to push them down into the board a little (if possible). Time will tell if this is a reliable, long-term solution, but it has worked for me so far. R5gordini 14:26, 7 January 2008 (CET)